Law Student Pro Bono

Law students want to do pro bono, but are they receiving substantial opportunities to do so?  Are they able to acquire legal skills, gain understanding of the professional responsibility to do pro bono, and make a difference for people with unmet legal needs?   In a landmark development, on May 22, 2012, New York State responded to these questions by adopting  a 50 hours pro bono service requirement as a condition of admission to the New York bar. The Center is:

  • Championing a 50 hour pro bono service requirement for inclusion in the ABA’s national accreditation standards for law schools.  
  • Supporting adoption of 50 hour pro bono service bar admission requirements in multiple states.
  • Supporting a law student campaign that is working to strengthen law student pro bono across the country.   
  • Writing a National Guide to Strengthening Law Student Pro Bono to Increase Access to Justice, with Equal Justice Works.
  • Developing a reform agenda for law student pro bono.
  • Publishing examples of successful law student pro bono programs and projects that can be replicated in settings across the country.  
  • Building and running model pro bono projects

Championing a 50 hour pro bono service graduation requirement for inclusion in the ABA’s national accreditation standards; Supporting adoption of pro bono service bar admission requirements in multiple states:

Developing a Reform Agenda for Law Student Pro Bono:

Publishing Examples of Replicable Law Student Pro Bono Programs and Projects:

Building and Running Model Pro Bono Projects:

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  1. […] of the ABA’s accreditor role.”  Here’s the National Law Journal article, and here’s a link to many of the proposals, which are housed on the National Center for Access to Justice’s website.  Finally, here’s a […]

  2. […] to build a pro bono requirement into the law school accreditation standards.  Here’s some background on that effort, and here’s the coverage of the ABA’s reaction.)  Now, UC Irvine Law dean Erwin […]



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